Coq au vin: chicken thighs slow-cooked in a red wine and bacon sauce, thickened with mushrooms, more red wine and some ground tomato if needed

Coq au vin (sort of)

Coq au vin is one of those dishes that is designed for a long, slow cook. And even if you don’t have a rooster (the cockerel part of coq au vin), chicken thighs make a good base, as does a whole chicken chopped into pieces that fit your pot. We’ve adapted this dish, as does everyone, to cope with the ingredients and the equipment we have.

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Salmon balls: paleo and no starch

A basic salmon ball recipe

Easy and tasty no starch recipes can be challenging to find. These little balls of salmon tastiness fit the bill perfectly in our household. They’re quick to make, so they’re great for an emergency school lunch on those badly organised mornings.

Kabac mucveri

Kabak mucveri

These deep fried balls of zucchini goodness have been a favourite restaurant menu item for longer than we’ve been married. Their kabac mucveris are bigger, fluffier and deeper-fried than ours, but you can’t expect miracles from a small home kitchen that doesn’t do deep frying at all. We do shallow frying and baking with an unhealthy amount of oil, and they’re all good.

Indian spiced pumpkin soup

Sunday soup: Indian spiced pumpkin soup

This spicy pumpkin soup is a favourite of my mother’s on a cold, winter day. If you’re coming out of winter right now, think of this as a reminder of when you really wanted something warm, toasty and comforting for lunch. If winter decided to pay you a quick visit this Easter, as it did us, then warm and toasty is exactly what we all need.

A different spicy tangy zucchini curry

Yes, we have our annual glut of zucchini from our veggie garden, and we’re on the search for new ideas. Apsara’s recipe for bitter gourd in spicy tangy gravy looked like it could be adapted to give our palates a different taste experience. And it was. It’s a deliciously tangy dish that makes zucchini taste like nothing else we are used to.

Corned silverside: you'll notice a mixture of thin and thick slices. That's to cater for the different meat-slicing preferences around here.

Corned beef

Corned beef is one of the great comfort foods in our family. It’s really easy to make, satisfying, and serves many if you have enough mashed potato to go with it. The high salt content makes it an occasional food, but that makes it even more special when it turns up for (as) dinner.

Tuna, tomato and basil pasta

We have a few standard car-camping meals, and the tuna, tomato and basil pasta is one of them. It tastes great, it can be cooked in a trangia (or over a campfire, but not in summer, alas), and it needs very little preparation. It’s also very healthy and full of calories, which is important when there’s another day of walking to come.

Greek fish soup

Sunday soup: Greek fish soup

This soup has everything needed for a hearty Sunday winter soup: fish, veggies, warmth and nothing too heavy to weigh us down for Monday. The magazine we took it from called it kakavia, which, it says, translates as Greek fish soup.

Dry chicken masala

Dry chicken masala

This dry chicken curry uses chicken masala powder as one of the main flavours, and the whole thing has been enjoyed by everyone: from aged grandma to the gung ho I like it spicy teenager. With some rice, or pilaf, the leftovers are the basis for school lunches.

Cottage pie

Our old-fashioned cottage pie

Cottage pie, shepherd’s pie … it’s just cooked meat topped with mashed potato, then baked. It sounds plain, and it is, but that’s its attraction. It’s quick and easy to make, never fails, and brings meat and three veggies to everyone in one easy dish.

Laksa, with a lot of coriander thanks to our garden

Laksa made with our own perfect paste

Laksa is easy to make, and it never fails, provided you have the right ingredients, including a good laksa paste. We now make our own paste that suits the tastes of a household heavily influenced by a variety of Asian restaurants around town.

Meat Madras, almost: there's some eggplant in there too!

Meat madras, almost

This Madras curry, my cookbook tells me, is a popular hot and spicy dish names after Madras, the major city of southern India. The hot and spicy label is hardly surprising once you read the recipe: it tells us to include at least five chillies! I have to admit using about half the recommended dose of chilli when…

Coleslaw an Asian style of dressing with coriander

Coleslaw two-ways (vegan)

It’s time for coleslaw. And not just any old coleslaw. This one comes with two options for dressing: one option is a recipe we’ve been using for years, uses a deliciously creamy, yet vegan mayonnaise, and everyone prefers it; the second one is now a new favourite and uses some much-loved ‘Asian’ flavours. Our new favourite is pictured here.